Don’t Ever Hit “Boost Post.” Ever.

by Andrew Krebs-Smith | May 14

I know it’s tempting. It’s such a pretty button. It would be so easy to press. You don’t even need to enter your credit card info. In less than 3 seconds the post on your Facebook page could have 10x-100x more reach! But don’t do it. Don’t ever hit Boost Post on Facebook. Let me tell you why.

Facebook’s biggest goal as a publicly traded for-profit company is to increase profits and shareholder value. Since the only thing of consequence that Facebook sells is advertising, this means making it easier for advertisers to spend money. We want our clients to spend money on Facebook advertising too, but since we are judged by the ROI of an ad spend, our goals differ from Facebook. Facebook wants to show your ads tboost posto as many people as possible, as quickly as possible. Facebook wants your ads to be successful, but they look at success in a different way. Since companies advertising on Facebook have various goals – engagement, awareness, purchases, traffic, etc. – Facebook doesn’t measure advertising success via just one metric. As long as Facebook is showing your ad to people it considers the “right” people, Facebook thinks it is doing a good job. However if you don’t guide Facebook towards your specific goal, Facebook will show it to anyone that is potentially in your target market, as opposed to people you are very sure you should be targeting.

When you hit “Boost Post,” Facebook basically throws your sponsored post out to your fans, their friends, and anyone else that might be a “good” fit. Except, as we just discussed, Facebook might think that someone who simply sees the post and keeps scrolling is a good fit. Facebook might think that someone who mindlessly clicks “like,” and then keeps scrolling is a good fit. Facebook might think that someone who clicks on the post and then leaves is a good fit. But we have a hunch that your goals might be a bit more important than traffic to your website that immediately bounces, yes? 

When you hit “Boost Post,” you are giving Facebook carte blanche discretion on your ad spend. You are saying – “here, Facebook, you probably know my customers better than I do. Can you show it to some of them?” Facebook then says, “yeah sure! here is a guy that likes almost every post that he ever sees.” Then you get a like, and you feel good. And Facebook has supposedly done its job.

Instead, why wouldn’t you want access to the myriad settings that you usually have when creating any other ad on Facebook? Why wouldn’t you want to hand-pick the exact audience that would be most interested in your message. Even if you want to target your fans, why wouldn’t you target them through a custom ad that lets you layer on more targeting options?

The beauty of Facebook Advertising is in the targeting. When you essentially opt out of this targeting by using Facebook’s “Boost Post” button, you’re missing out and throwing your money away. To actually get the most out of Facebook Advertising, check out the advice below:

How to Save Thousands of Dollars on Facebook Ad Testing
How to Know if Your Facebook Advertising is Working

Andrew Krebs-Smith
About the author

Andrew Krebs-Smith

Helping B2C Retail/Ecomm companies test, measure, and scale digital marketing. Trying to fix the agency model so that agencies are accountable to every client media dollar they spend.